PTSD Test

Start assessing the possibility that you have PTSD.

A PTSD test will help orient you to symptoms and assess how much (or how little) you actually may be struggling with PTSD-specific symptoms.

In addition, understanding all there is about how trauma affects your brain can help you figure out what you need in order to feel better.

 

PTSD SELF-TEST

Need a quick idea as to whether or not you’re in the PTSD ballpark?

check-mark-tracyhickmanRead this PTSD overview of PTSD symptoms.

Then, download any of the free archives of our radio show for in-depth analysis and explanations by experts in the field of trauma, PTSD and recovery.


 

 

PTSD Test

 
Do you suspect you might have PTSD? Or, do you wonder if how you’re feeling includes elements of PTSD? The following questions can be your first step toward determining if you have symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. The benefit of this will be to give you a baseline understanding of your experience,plus it will help you decide whether or not you should seek a diagnosis or treatment from a qualified doctor or mental health professional.
Instructions: If you suspect that you might suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, complete the following PTSD self-test by clicking the “yes or “no” boxes next to each question.

 

1 ) Have you experienced or been exposed to a traumatic event?
  Yes/No
2 ) During the traumatic event, did you experience or witness serious injury or death, or the threat of injury or death?
  Yes/No
3 ) During the traumatic event did you feel intense fear, helplessness, and/or horror?
  Yes/No
4 ) Do you regularly experience intrusive thoughts or images about the traumatic event?
  Yes/No
5 ) Do you experience moments that feel as if you are re-living the event, or even that it is happening again in real time?
  Yes/No
6 ) Do you have recurrent nightmares or distressing dreams about the traumatic event?
  Yes/No
7 ) Do you feel intense physical and/or emotional distress when something reminds you of the traumatic event, whether it’s something you think about or something in you see?
  Yes/No
8 ) Do you do your best to avoid thoughts, feelings, or conversations that remind you of the traumatic event?
  Yes/No
9 ) Do you do your best to avoid activities, people, or places that remind you of the traumatic event?
  Yes/No
10 ) Do you have memory gaps or find yourself unable to remember something important about the traumatic event?
  Yes/No
11 ) Since the trauma occurred do you feel less interested in activities or hobbies that you used to enjoy?
  Yes/No
12 ) Since the trauma occurred do you feel distant from other people or have difficulty trusting them?
  Yes/No
13 ) Since the trauma occurred do you have difficulty regulating, experiencing or showing emotions?
  Yes/No
14 ) Do you feel negative about your future, including feeling it will not be “normal”, or that you won’t have a career, marriage, children, or a normally expected life span?
  Yes/No
15 ) Since the traumatic event occurred do you have difficulty falling or staying asleep?
  Yes/No
16 ) Since the traumatic event occurred do you feel irritable or have outbursts of anger?
  Yes/No
17 ) Since the traumatic event occurred do you have difficulty concentrating?
  Yes/No
18 ) Since the traumatic event occurred do you feel guilty because others died or were hurt during the event but you survived?
  Yes/No
19 ) Since the traumatic event occurred do you often feel jumpy or startle easily?
  Yes/No
20 ) Since the traumatic event occurred do you often feel hypervigilant, i.e. are you constantly feeling and acting ready for any kind of danger or threat?
  Yes/No
 21) For any of the symptoms you’ve recognized above, has your experience of them lasted for longer than one month?
  Yes/No
22 ) Do the symptoms you experience interfere with normal routines, work or school, or social activities?
  Yes/No

SCORING:

Add up the number of “Yes” answers….

1-3 = few symptoms of PTSD • 4-9 = PTSD likely • 10+ = You display many symptoms of PTSD

If you believe you have PTSD share this self-test your doctor or other healing professional. This is NOT a diagnosis. Only a doctor or qualified mental health professional can make a diagnosis of PTSD.

This PTSD test is based upon the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 4th Ed.) criteria for PTSD, 2004.

If you’ve been diagnosed or feel you do have PTSD, some things to begin your healing process:

  • Make an appointment to see your family doctor. (Take the results of the self test with you.)
  • Get a recommendation for a trained trauma professional, therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, or practitioner.
  • Tell family members of your condition so they can understand and support you.
  • Speak to your religious leader.
  • Educate yourself about PTSD so you understand what you are experiencing.
  • Develop a support system for healing.
  • Reach out and connect with other survivors. (For support ideas click here.)
  • If you’re a veteran contact your local VA.